Game Censorship Information

What is the Office of Film and Literature Classification Board?

New Zealand's censorship system is established by the Films, Videos, and Publications Classification Act 1993. The censorship system is designed to protect the New Zealand public from material that is likely to be harmful, or injurious to the public good. The Act defines what is considered harmful, and establishes criteria for rating, classifying and labeling films, computer games and other publications.

The New Zealand Classification Board has a Web site at http://www.censorship.govt.nz/ so that parents and kids can access up-to-date rating information.

OFLC Rating Labels

Image of G label.

G - Unrestricted

Anyone can be shown or sold this. The G rating can be given by the Film and Video Labeling Body and the Office of Film and Literature Classification.

Image of PG label.

PG - Unrestricted

Parental guidance may be needed for younger viewers. The PG rating can be given by the Film and Video Labeling Body and the Office of Film and Literature Classification.

It is important to remember that not all G or PG level films are made for children and many are aimed at an adult audience.

Image of M label.

M - Unrestricted

More suitable for viewers over 16 years. The M rating can be given by the Film and Video Labeling Body and the Office of Film and Literature Classification.

Image of R13 label.

R13 – Restricted

It is illegal for anyone to show or sell this to someone under 13 years of age. An R13 classification is given by the Office of Film and Literature Classification.

Image of R15 label.

R15 – Restricted

It is illegal for anyone to show or sell this to someone under 15 years of age. An R15 classification is given by the Office of Film and Literature Classification.

Image of R16 label.

R16 – Restricted

It is illegal for anyone to show or sell this to someone under 16 years of age. An R16 classification is given by the Office of Film and Literature Classification.

Image of R18 label.

R18 – Restricted

It is illegal to show or sell this to someone under 18 years of age. An R18 classification is given by the Office of Film and Literature Classification.

Are there parental control settings on the Xbox and Xbox 360 video game systems?

You can limit the type of content played on the Xbox video game system based on the OFLC classification level. By default, the Xbox and Xbox 360 video game systems are set to play all content. You can select separate parental control levels for games and DVD movies.

Xbox and Xbox 360 will play games and DVD movies that are rated at or below the selected level. For example, if the selected level is Parental Guidance (PG), only games rated PG and G will play in the system. If you choose any level other than ALL, you must select a pass code.